Friday, May 25, 2018

Media must not be turned into an investigative arm of police, Vice lawyer tells Supreme Court

The Star's Tonda MacCharles writes:
"The media’s ability to shield their sources, notes and reporting materials from police “fishing expeditions” could be strengthened after a senior federal Crown attorney made several concessions in a high-profile media case Wednesday at the Supreme Court of Canada.
"Vice Media is fighting the RCMP’s effort to seize reporter Ben Makuch’s 2014 texts and communications with Farah Shirdon, a self-declared Canadian ISIS fighter.
"Although Shirdon is reported to be dead, the Crown and the RCMP have not given up the pursuit of Vice Media materials, and federal lawyer Croft Michaelson hammered the fact Shirdon could still be alive, could still return to Canada, and the public interest in prosecuting him remains high."
Full story

Tuesday, May 22, 2018

The U.S. EPA prevents three news organizations from attending conference on water contaminants

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency kept three news organizations from attending a national summit on harmful water contaminants on Tuesday morning, with the agency insisting it did so because the room was full.
The Associated Press, CNN and E&E News were prevented from attending the first half of the meeting. Politico said its reporter had been allowed into the event, but would be asked to leave for the afternoon.
Following Tuesday morning's reports, EPA announced that the second half of the day would be open to press.
AP reported that security guards grabbed its reporter by the shoulders and "forcibly" shoved her out of the EPA building.
"The Environmental Protection Agency's selective barring of news organizations, including the AP, from covering today's meeting is alarming and a direct threat to the public's right to know about what is happening inside their government," AP Executive Editor Sally Buzbee said in a statement. "It is particularly distressing that any journalist trying to cover an event in the public interest would be forcibly removed.
CNN said in a statement that it had been turned away from covering the summit.
"While several news organizations were permitted, the EPA selectively excluded CNN and other media outlets," it said. "We understand the importance of an open and free press and we hope the EPA does, too."
E&E, an environment and energy-focused news site, said on Twitter that its own reporter had also been prevented from attending. E&E reported the event was open to the press, but not to reporters from the barred organizations.

Saturday, May 19, 2018

The Last Days of Time Inc.(NY Times)

 

Wednesday, May 16, 2018

CBC warns past, current staff personal data may be at risk after break-in, theft of computer

The CBC is warning more than 20,000 of its past, present and contract employees that their personal and financial information may be at risk after a break-in and the theft of computer equipment.
"An intruder recently broke into a secure area of CBC/Radio-Canada, stealing a piece of computer equipment," Judith Purves, executive vice-president and CFO of CBC, said in a statement.
"We have determined that the stolen equipment, while password-protected, may contain electronic files, including some financial information."
Employees received an email on Wednesday saying that a letter has been sent to the home addresses of all employees detailing the information that has been put at risk — including names, bank accounts and amounts deposited into bank accounts by CBC.
CBC has budgeted $300,000 to cover the cost of notifying those affected by the breach and providing employees with a year's worth of credit monitoring and insurance against identity theft. (CBC web page)
Full story

Saturday, May 12, 2018

Changing channels at Rogers: A creative cost cutter navigates a TV industry under threat

Susan Krashinsky Robertson writes in the ROB: 
It was early 2015, and Colette Watson, new to her job as vice-president of broadcast television at Rogers Media Inc., had just been handed an ugly assignment.
For decades, Rogers had run multicultural television stations under the OMNI name. They were losing significant amounts of money – and there was little hope it would get better. OMNI had become a big financial drag on a media company that was still trying to digest its $5.2-billion contract with the National Hockey League for 12 years of broadcast rights.
Ms. Watson’s marching orders from then-president Keith Pelley: “Shut it down.”
“The entire broadcast media group at Rogers was losing a ton of money,” Ms. Watson recalls now. “I chased Keith around saying, ‘Please let me do this. I think this can be fixed.’”
Full story

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